Open Mic 2 pic

Open Mic Jacksonville 2

Chapter Nine of Tiger Claws is included in this exciting anthology of Jacksonville authors and poets. You can view it on Amazon. Or see me in person on March 23 at the Barnes & Noble on San Jose Blvd. Other appearances in Jacksonville will be announced via blog post, Twitter, and Grand Graffiti Facebook page: Like & follow!

 

 

Previously in print under the pseudonym Alaric Jaxartes:

 

RUSH WEEK

“It is good that war is a terrible thing, else we would grow too fond of it.” –Robert E. Lee

 

Someone forgot to tell the boys of Sigma Omicron Beta. When Lee’s namesake arrives at college, he doesn’t fit the S.O.B. mold but he’s a legacy. It’s about joining. When the Pledge Committee declares war on Montgomery Lee, how much pain must he take to belong?

 

Follow his freshman adventures in Rush Week: freshman orientation week, meeting girls and falling in love, his best friend Travis’ conversion, and more. Find out what the men who really run the fraternity are up to, and how far they will go to protect their operations. Read about the escalating hazing pranks that stop being pranks. What happens at a fraternity football game during a hurricane? Get Rush Week now.

 


 

TATTERED FLAGS:

“No good deed goes unpunished.” –George Santayana

 

When Boy Scout Troop 809 goes into a state forest preserve to clean up industrial dumping, they find that their very presence in the forest brings controversy from their environmentally-minded peers and the media. Despite the opposition, the Scouts persevere in their efforts until a forest fire threatens to end their operation and the attempts of several Scouts to earn their eagle rank, the highest achievement in Scouting.

 

A satirical take on those who opposed the Iraq War and why, and their motivations as opposed to those who went into battle, Tattered Flags examines the irony of those who betray their principles with no grasp of their hypocrisy. It will remind you of Theodore Roosevelt, who said:

 

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.